Yum Cha at Tingha Palace

I’d always wanted to have dim sum for the past few weekends, but somehow, certain events always came up during the last minute and the plan had to be put on hold. That was the case, until last Sunday, when I finally managed to get a leisurely few hours to have dim sum for lunch at Tingha Palace in Parramatta Leagues Club. It was our first time there, and we were unsure of what to expect. Located inside a club, parking was aplenty and free. We made our way to the entrance of the restaurant and were given a number. Thankfully, we didn’t have to wait too long before our number was called, and we had a table in a nice and quiet corner.

Pu Er tea

Pu Er Tea

To start with, we ordered the Pu Er Tea to go with our dishes, because Yum Cha essentially means drink tea! The restaurant was busy but under control, with trolleys of dim sum rolling by every few minutes or so. Most of the wait staff who served us were also very friendly and had good service. For example, a trolley with mostly deep-fried items stopped by, but we were not interested in any of the items so we politely declined. But could we please have some Char Siew Pao and Chee Cheong Fun, we asked the waitress? Not only was she not upset that we didn’t pick any of her items, she actually ordered the items we asked for, and they were on our table within minutes. So very efficient! I had actually tried this with a few other waitresses, and all of my orders actually materialized, without me having to wait for the correct trolleys to come by. We were certainly impressed.

Siew Mai

Siew Mai / Pork Dumplings

My favourite item from the visit was the Siew Mai or Pork Dumplings. They were huge and filled with a mixture of succulent prawns and juicy minced pork, nicely wrapped in thin wonton skin. One of the downfalls of the many dim sum places that I visited was that they tend to over-steam the siew mai, making them dark and soggy. The ones we had here were perfectly steamed and served steaming hot.

Har Kau

Har Kau / Prawn Dumplings

Another mainstay of dim sum is the Har Kau, or Prawn Dumplings. These were nicely steamed as well (no breakage of skin), though it would have been better with slightly thinner or more translucent skin. Otherwise, the prawn fillings were generous and succulent, all packed in a huge parcel of a dumpling.

Har Kau

Generous filling of succulent prawns

Saucer noticed a few tables around us ordering the Braised Chicken Feet (Foong Chau) so we followed suit. I am personally not a fan of the chicken feet, but I wouldn’t mind eating them once in a while. I found these to be soft and easy to eat, with quite a nice flavour to it.

Braised Chicken feet

Foong Chau / Braised Chicken Feet

Coming from Malaysia, Lor Mai Kai is a common dim sum item, but when we asked for that, we were presented with Glutinous Rice wrapped in Lotus Leaf (Hor Yip Fan) instead. And 3 packets of them, no less! Man, how were we going to finish them, we thought. These were unfortunately, not as good as lor mai kai, and had a milder flavour with a dry texture. Also, the fact that there were 3 in a steamer made it even harder for us to finish them off, since glutinous rice can be cloying if too much of it is consumed.

Hor Yip Fan

Hor Yip Fan / Glutinous Rice wrapped in Lotus Leaf

Hor Yip Fan

Inside the Hor Yip Fan

Thankfully, the Char Siew Pao (BBQ Pork Buns) managed to save the day. These were served steaming hot and in a reasonable mini size. I loved the fluffy pao with savoury BBQ pork fillings that I could finish in a few bites. Best to be eaten hot!

Char Siew Pao

Char Siew Pao / BBQ Pork Buns

One trolley that we found interesting was the Pan-Fried Chee Cheong Fun, where the waitress fried the rice noodle rolls to order. Since we had never had this before, we ordered a plate to try and boy, was it a huge one! It was served with sprinkles of fried dried shrimps, which gave it a nice aroma, and the noodles had a slightly crispy exterior. It was definitely something different to our conventional Chee Cheong Fun. The only problem was that the portion was way too huge for the 2 of us, and we ended up having to takeaway more than half of it home. These were best eaten either with the soy sauce it was served in, or with the sweet and nutty sauce that came on the side. Eating with the latter definitely reminded me of the Penang style chee cheong fun!

Pan fried chee cheong fun

Pan-Fried Chee Cheong Fun

Finally, even though we were filled to the brim, I simply had to order the Tau Fu Fa for dessert! The Tau Fu Fa lady had already passed by our table many times and when we were finally ready to order, she was all smiles. The Tau Fu Fa or Soybean Custard did not disappoint! It was extremely smooth and soft, but still had a certain amount of firmness that melted in your mouth. Saucer also loved the fact that the syrup was not overly sweet. He almost couldn’t stop himself from slurping the dessert and warned me to quickly eat my share before he finished it all up!

Tau foo far

Tau Fu Fa / Soybean Custard with Syrup

Tingha Palace

Dining environment in Tingha Palace

Overall, we had a pleasant yum cha experience in Tingha Palace, mainly due to some of the good quality dim sum they served, as well as the professional service we had from the wait staff. It was certainly impressive considering the restaurant was full house. For the both of us, the bill came up to AUD$44, and you could see that we really stuffed ourselves silly. For what we ordered, it could easily feed 3 persons! Needless to say, we wouldn’t mind returning if we have more cravings for dim sum in the future.

Tingha Palace

Tingha Palace

  • 20% discount for cash payments during weekdays
  • 10% discount for cash payments during weekends

Tingha Palace
2/13-15 O’Connell St
Parramatta
NSW 2150 Australia.
Phone: (02) 9890 1688
Yum Cha Hours: Mon to Fri (11.00am to 3.00pm), Sat & Sun (10.00am to 3.00pm)
Website: http://www.parraleagues.com.au/default.aspx?id=125

Tingha Palace on Urbanspoon

Cheap Japanese Fast Food

I have always thought that eating out in Sydney is expensive, especially coming from Malaysia where we still tend to convert prices from AUD$ to RM (sometimes it comes naturally!). Of course, I don’t do that now, or I’ll end up staying at home all the time. :) But just a few weeks ago, my cousin pointed me to a place in the city that apparently had ‘cheap’ food. Well she had been in Sydney for a much longer time than me so I didn’t know whether her definition of cheap was similar to mine. Anyway, Saucer and I were in town so we decided to stop by Oiden Bowl Bar. For starters, it was easy to find because it’s situated along one of the main streets in the CBD, George Street. Secondly, it was also a short walking distance from Town Hall train station, so getting there was no hassle for us.

Japanese Curry rice

Japanese Plain Curry Rice

Once we were there, we noticed that there was a queue towards the counter, and it seemed that food was self-served. There was just a one page menu pasted on the wall, with a variety of toppings on rice and different sizes (small, medium, large). We just had to grab a tray, queue up, order, get our order almost immediately and pay at the counter. It was a pretty efficient process because all of the items were prepared on-the-spot by just putting your desired toppings on the rice bowls. It was literally, Japanese fast food. Before you reach the counter, there was also a bar filled with side dishes such as pork katsu (deep fried pork cutlet), chicken karaage (deep fried chicken),  takoyaki (squid balls) and so on. You could choose the sides that you want (or not) and place them on the tray before moving to the counter to pay.

Chicken Teriyaki rice

Teriyaki Chicken Rice (Small – AUD$3.90)

I wasn’t feeling too hungry that day, so I opted for a small portion of Teriyaki Chicken Rice and it cost only $3.90! That has got to be the cheapest meal I’d ever had in Sydney, dining in! The portion was slightly smaller than, say, the Teriyaki Chicken Rice in Sakae Sushi, but it was just right for me at the point of time. Of course, one could choose to have a regular or large size if one is feeling famished. The rice came with skinless chicken breast, which was a very healthy option, on top of some seaweed. It wasn’t great-tasting but it wasn’t bad either. It was certainly good value.

Chicken and pork katsu

Chicken Karaage and Pork Katsu (AUD$4.50 for both)

Saucer had the Japanese Plain Curry Rice, regular size, which was quite huge. That was also the same price as my chicken rice, and was only $2.90 for small size. The curry was thick and flavourful and had a generous amount of vegetables within. It was also a nice comfort food especially during the cold winter days. From the side dishes, we picked the Chicken Karaage and Pork Katsu to share and they turned out to be pretty good. I preferred the chicken to the pork since I found the chicken to be very tender and juicy with a nice crispy marinade. It reminded me of belacan chicken in Malaysia!

Japanese Curry rice

Japanese Plain Curry Rice (Regular – AUD$3.90)

Overall we had cheap and fulfilling meal at Oiden, and definitely wouldn’t mind returning again whenever we drop by the city. It was fuss-free, decent and very good value for money. Just make sure you go before or after peak dining hours because getting a place to sit could be tricky then.

Oiden Bowl Bar
Shop 12, 531-557, George Street,
Sydney
NSW 2000 Australia.
Tel No.: +61(2) 9267 1368
Opening Hours: Daily (11.30am – 10pm)
Website: www.oiden.com.au

Menya Oiden on Urbanspoon

Home-Made Char Kuey Teow

Whenever I describe Char Kuey Teow to someone in Australia, he/she would immediately say, “That sounds like Pad Thai!”. While Pad Thai may have some similar ingredients as Char Kuey Teow, they are definitely not the same dish, in that the sauce and preparation are very different. Having worked in Penang for a good few years before this, I have had my share of authentic Penang Char Kuey Teow (really, the only place to find the best Char Kuey Teow in the world) that I have not been able to find anywhere else in the country. Some versions of Char Kuey Teow in KL were pretty decent, but they were just not quite the same. Now that I’m in Sydney, it’s even harder to find a good plate of Char Kuey Teow, not to mention an authentic Penang-flavoured one! Therefore, I put it as a mission for myself to cook up a plate of Char Kuey Teow on my own, just to satisfy my cravings. Of course, what I get is still a far cry from the original version, but I’d have to make do with whatever ingredients and equipment I have to come up with the best that I can. :)

Char Kuey Teow

Home-cooked Char Kuey Teow

Ingredients:

Chilli paste:

  • 8 dried chillies (soaked in water)
  • 2 fresh red chillies
  • 2 bird’s eye chillies (optional)
  • 1 large shallot or 2 medium shallots
  • Dash of salt

Sauce:

  • 5 tbsp of light soya sauce
  • 2 tbsp of dark soya sauce
  • 2 tbsp of fish sauce
  • Dash of salt and white pepper

Others:

  • 10 prawns deshelled
  • 500g flat rice noodles / hor fun
  • 2 Chinese sausages / lap cheong sliced
  • 300g bean sprouts
  • 20 slices of fish cake
  • 5 cloves of garlic chopped
  • 2 eggs
  • 1-2 stalks of spring onions chopped into 4-cm lengths
  • Cooking oil

Char Kuey Teow ingredients

Some of the ingredients – prawns and fish cake slices

Lap cheong

Lap cheong / Chinese sausage

Steps:

1. Blend the ingredients of chilli paste until fine.

2. Heat the wok with 2 tbsp of oil and fry the garlic until slightly golden.

3. Add in the chilli paste and stir fry until fragrant.

4. Add in the prawns and fry until they turn orange in colour.

5. Add in the fish cake slices and Chinese sausages and fry until the fat of the sausages start to melt.

6. Add in the flat rice noodles, give a few good stir and pour in the sauce mixture.

7. Stir fry until the sauce covers all the noodles, and make space to break the eggs on the pan/wok.

8. Break the eggs and stir fry the noodles at high heat.

9. Lastly, add in the bean sprouts and spring onion.

Char Kuey Teow

Char Kuey Teow

The Char Kuey Teow turned out to be hot and spicy, just the way I like it. The drawback though, was that I don’t have a gas cooker at home, only an electric cook top. That meant that I couldn’t use a wok and flame to get the wok hei (heat of wok) that’s required to make this dish brilliant. Given what limited resources that I had, I was pretty satisfied with the outcome, and quite proud of myself too! I’m hoping that in the future, when we do get a gas cook top with a proper wok, I could improve on the taste of this home-cooked Char Kuey Teow. :)

Char Kuey Teow

4.0 from 1 reviews
Char Kuey Teow
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Main
Cuisine: Malaysian
Serves: 2-3
Ingredients
Chilli paste:
  • 8 dried chillies (soaked in water)
  • 2 fresh red chillies
  • 2 bird's eye chillies (optional)
  • 1 large shallot or 2 medium shallots
  • Dash of salt
Sauce:
  • 5 tbsp of light soya sauce
  • 2 tbsp of dark soya sauce
  • 2 tbsp of fish sauce
  • Dash of salt and white pepper
Others:
  • 10 prawns deshelled
  • 500g flat rice noodles / hor fun
  • 2 Chinese sausages / lap cheong sliced
  • 300g bean sprouts
  • 20 slices of fish cake
  • 5 cloves of garlic chopped
  • 2 eggs
  • 1-2 stalks of spring onions chopped into 4-cm lengths
  • Cooking oil
Instructions
  1. Blend the ingredients of chilli paste until fine.
  2. Heat the wok with 2 tbsp of oil and fry the garlic until slightly golden.
  3. Add in the chilli paste and stir fry until fragrant.
  4. Add in the prawns and fry until they turn orange in colour.
  5. Add in the fish cake slices and Chinese sausages and fry until the fat of the sausages start to melt.
  6. Add in the flat rice noodles, give a few good stir and pour in the sauce mixture.
  7. Stir fry until the sauce covers all the noodles, and make space to break the eggs on the pan/wok.
  8. Break the eggs and stir fry the noodles at high heat.
  9. Lastly, add in the bean sprouts and spring onion.

Vivid Sydney Festival

Last Saturday, Saucer and I decided to head out to the city to catch the final days of Vivid Sydney, a festival of light, music and ideas. Vivid is an annual affair that transforms Sydney into a canvas of light projections and music that display the creativity and ideas of local talents. The colourful festival is set to run from 24 May to 10 June 2013, with lights turning on after dark. Since it’s winter, the sky turns dark pretty early and we get to see the lights turning on starting from 6pm.

 Vivid Festival 2013

Vivid Sydney 2013

We took the train to the city, knowing that traffic would be bad and using public transport was going to be the best way to get in and out of the Sydney. And we were right. The weather was starting to be gloomy when we were in the train in the afternoon, and before we knew it, it started raining. And the rain didn’t stop for most part of the night! It was one thing to brave the crowd, but it was another to go through it with umbrellas tangling into one another along the way. It was indeed quite a challenge with the occasional strong winds blowing our umbrellas away too! I thought that with the rain pouring, there would be less crowd, but clearly the rain didn’t dampen the spirits of many.

Vivid Festival 2013 Opera House

View of the Sydney Opera House

Vivid Festival 2013 Harbour Bridge

Harbour Bridge

Anyway, since we were already there, we persevered and walked along The Rocks to Circular Quay, the Museum of Contemporary Arts and all the way to the Sydney Opera House. The photos were taken with iPhone 5, so pardon the quality. And as you can imagine, there would be a number of photos with umbrellas in it! :)

Sydney Opera House

Umbrellas and the Sydney Opera House

Sydney Opera House

Vivid lights on the Opera House

Vivid Festival 2013

Light installations that looked like Light Sabers

Vivid Festival 2013

A light tunnel

An interesting location to watch the lights was at the Museum of Contemporary Arts. I managed to get quite a nice spot to capture the pictures and a video, together with the audio to go along with it. It definitely reminded me of the Symphony of Lights that I watched before in Hong Kong, watching the lights and music working in harmony.

Vivid Festival 2013 Museum of Contemporary Arts

Museum of Contemporary Arts

Museum of Contemporary Arts

Museum of Contemporary Arts

Museum of Contemporary Arts

Museum of Contemporary Arts

Video of Vivid Sydney at the Museum of Contemporary Arts

There were many other light installations that we didn’t get to visit, mainly because of the rain. However, being a first-timer, we were quite happy to be part of the spirited crowd that night, that braved on through the constant rain and wind. Hopefully, before the festival is over, we would get another chance to witness it in a better weather.

Vivid Festival 2013

View of Circular Quay Railway Station

Vivid Festival 2013

View of Sydney Opera House from The Rocks

Vivid Festival 2013

Vivid Sydney Festival 2013

For more information and timetable, visit www.vividsydney.com.

Costa Adeje: Perfect Tenerife

Weekend is coming soon, and what else does one do other than letting one’s hair down and have some beach fun? Today’s guest post is in collaboration with Playa Real resort, a gorgeous paradise in the beautiful Costa Adeje resort area in the island of Tenerife. Being one of the latest resort area in town, Costa Adeje offers more than just a terrific coastline, new hotels and better beach facilities.

Tenerife is much more than a beach holiday destination. This beautiful island in the Canaries is known as much for its dramatic, volcanic scenery and exotic green foliage as for its sandy beaches. The island is a spectacular setting for a holiday, boasting some plush resorts where you can kick back and relax. Costa Adeje is one of the newest resort areas in Tenerife, a sunny coastline awash with chic hotels and modern attractions, perfect for families and couples alike.

 Playa Real Resort1

As well as its rather pricey upmarket hotels, Costa Adeje has some good value resorts that will save you money on your holiday. Playa Real is an all-inclusive resort in a great location for exploring the Costa Adeje. The island is famed for its golf courses so if you’re a keen golfer, this could be the perfect place for you. The area has numerous attractions for children and families including Aqualand waterpark, Go-karting and ten-pin bowling. Jet2holidays offer some great deals on package holidays that could keep your costs low and leave you free to manage your spending money easily.

Whether you’re planning a family holiday or a romantic getaway, Tenerife has an abundance of incredible things to see and do during your stay. The Mercedes Mountains are an ideal location for hiking, where the wonderful pine-scented foliage will provide an exciting change from the sunny beach. Tenerife is home to the world’s third-largest volcano, Mount Teide, and visitors can take an incredible ride to the top in a cable car. The views are spectacular and on a clear day you can see some of the other Canary Islands.

If you’re looking for some culture during your holiday, Tenerife’s Magma Art Centre has a wide-selection of events taking place all year round. The show ‘History’ is a musical made up of more than 30 artists from 14 different countries, covering the history of music from classical pieces to more modern music. There is certainly a lot packed into a two hour show – with music from Beethoven, Mozart, Abba, Michael Jackson and songs from well-known musicals like Phantom of the Opera. And if that didn’t sound like enough there are even acrobats, dancers and incredible audiovisuals to accompany the live musicians and singers.

 Playa Real Resort 2

With so many great attractions and activities on offer, the Costa Adeje is the perfect place to stay and explore the wonders of Tenerife.

Kai See Hor Fun

Growing up in Perak, it is a given that we have had some experience with Kai See Hor Fun or Nga Choy Kai in Ipoh at some point or other in our lives. The likes of Lou Wong or Onn Kee are common to anyone who visits Ipoh for the famous and smooth hor fun / flat rice noodles and tender chicken. So what happens when we live so far away from Ipoh and yet crave for the heartwarming good hor fun? DIY! Granted, there are a lot of variables that could make or break this dish, but when one is desperate, one can’t be too fussy. :) So here is my simple Kai See Hor Fun recipe, inspired by the Ipoh-style nga choy kai (bean sprouts with chicken). The recipe for poached chicken is similar to the one I used for Hainanese Chicken Rice, but for ease of reference, I’ll copy and paste it again here.

Kai see hor fun

Kai See Hor Fun / Flat rice noodles with chicken

Flat rice noodles soup

Slippery smooth!

Ingredients:

a) For Chicken

  • 1/2 a chicken (free range preferably)
  • 2 stalks of scallions
  • 1/2 bulb garlic
  • 1 piece of ginger (about 2 to 3 inches long)
  • Sesame oil
  • Salt
  • 3 tsp of garlic and shallot oil
  • Coriander

b) For noodles

  • 500 g of fresh hor fun / flat rice noodles
  • 10 medium size prawn heads
  • Shallots
  • Coriander
  • Cooking oil
  • Coriander
  • Bird’s eye chillies
  • Soy sauce

c) For Beansprouts

  • 500 g of bean sprouts
  • Dash of white pepper
  • Soy sauce
  • Shallot oil
  • Coriander

Flat rice noodles soup

Poached chicken with hor fun

Bean sprouts

Bean sprouts

Flat rice noodles soup

Serve with bird’s eye chillies and soy sauce

Steps:

a) For Chicken:

1. Bring a pot of water to boil. Make sure the water level can cover the whole chicken when it’s dipped in.

2.Marinate chicken with salt and sesame oil by rubbing them in liberally on the surface. Remove excess chicken fat.

3. Peel the garlic cloves, chop the scallions into about 3cm length and slice the ginger before putting them all into the boiling water.

4. Once the water is boiling hot, place the chicken into the water and let it boil for about 5 minutes.

5. Cover the pot and turn off the heat. Let the chicken simmer inside the hot water for about 30 minutes (or more depending on the size of chicken). If you’re worried about the chicken being too pink (like me), turn on the heat again after about 15 minutes, and turn it off once the water starts boiling.

6. Remove the chicken from the pot and transfer to a big bowl filled with ice water. Let it soak for about 2 minutes.

7. Drain the ice water and chop the chicken into pieces.

8. Drizzle chicken with garlic and shallot oil and soy sauce. Garnish with coriander.

Kai see hor fun

Complete Kai See Hor Fun meal

b) For Noodles:

1. While the chicken is boiling, heat up a small pot with about 4 tablespoons of oil.

2. Fry the prawn heads until they turn crispy and the oil becomes orange-red in colour.

3. Drain the oil into a bowl and set aside.

4. Once the chicken is cooked, blanch the noodles in boiling water for 2-3 minutes, until they are soft and disintegrated.

5. Place the noodles in a boil and pour chicken stock (from the poached chicken) onto the noodles. You can flavour the chicken stock at this point by adding in more salt or chicken stock cubes if required.

6. Drizzle with 3 teaspoons of prawn oil to get that orange colour and nice fragrance.

7. Garnish with some fried shallots and coriander.

c) For Beansprouts:

1. Blanch the beansprouts in boiling water for about 3 minutes (until water is bubbling).

2. While waiting, heat up some oil and fry shallots until golden and fragrant.

3. Transfer the cooked beansprouts to a plate and drizzle with some shallot oil.

4. Add a dash of white pepper and soy sauce onto the bean sprouts, and garnish with coriander.

Ipoh kai si hor fun

Perfect meal for a cold winter night

To me, this bowl of hor fun was perfect during a cold night. Somehow, the act of slurping smooth and slippery noodles is just therapeutic, and coupled with the piping hot soup, it really is food for the soul.

4.0 from 1 reviews
Kai See Hor Fun / Flat Rice Noodles soup
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Main
Cuisine: Malaysian
Serves: 2
Ingredients
a) For Chicken
  • ½ a chicken (free range preferably)
  • 2 stalks of scallions
  • ½ bulb garlic
  • 1 piece of ginger (about 2 to 3 inches long)
  • Sesame oil
  • Salt
  • 3 tsp of garlic and shallot oil
  • Coriander
b) For noodles
  • 500 g of fresh hor fun / flat rice noodles
  • 10 medium size prawn heads
  • Shallots
  • Coriander
  • Cooking oil
  • Coriander
  • Bird's eye chillies
  • Soy sauce
c) For Beansprouts
  • 500 g of bean sprouts
  • Dash of white pepper
  • Soy sauce
  • Shallot oil
  • Coriander
Instructions
a) For Chicken:
  1. Bring a pot of water to boil. Make sure the water level can cover the whole chicken when it’s dipped in.
  2. Marinate chicken with salt and sesame oil by rubbing them in liberally on the surface. Remove excess chicken fat.
  3. Peel the garlic cloves, chop the scallions into about 3cm length and slice the ginger before putting them all into the boiling water.
  4. Once the water is boiling hot, place the chicken into the water and let it boil for about 5 minutes.
  5. Cover the pot and turn off the heat. Let the chicken simmer inside the hot water for about 30 minutes (or more depending on the size of chicken). If you’re worried about the chicken being too pink (like me), turn on the heat again after about 15 minutes, and turn it off once the water starts boiling.
  6. Remove the chicken from the pot and transfer to a big bowl filled with ice water. Let it soak for about 2 minutes.
  7. Drain the ice water and chop the chicken into pieces.
  8. Drizzle chicken with garlic and shallot oil and soy sauce. Garnish with coriander.
b) For Noodles:
  1. While the chicken is boiling, heat up a small pot with about 4 tablespoons of oil.
  2. Fry the prawn heads until they turn crispy and the oil becomes orange-red in colour.
  3. Drain the oil into a bowl and set aside.
  4. Once the chicken is cooked, blanch the noodles in boiling water for 2-3 minutes, until they are soft and disintegrated.
  5. Place the noodles in a boil and pour chicken stock (from the poached chicken) onto the noodles. You can flavour the chicken stock at this point by adding in more salt or chicken stock cubes if required.
  6. Drizzle with 3 teaspoons of prawn oil to get that orange colour and nice fragrance.
  7. Garnish with some fried shallots and coriander.
c) For Beansprouts:
  1. Blanch the beansprouts in boiling water for about 3 minutes (until water is bubbling).
  2. While waiting, heat up some oil and fry shallots until golden and fragrant.
  3. Transfer the cooked beansprouts to a plate and drizzle with some shallot oil.
  4. Add a dash of white pepper and soy sauce onto the bean sprouts, and garnish with coriander.