Home-Made Char Kuey Teow

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Whenever I describe Char Kuey Teow to someone in Australia, he/she would immediately say, “That sounds like Pad Thai!”. While Pad Thai may have some similar ingredients as Char Kuey Teow, they are definitely not the same dish, in that the sauce and preparation are very different. Having worked in Penang for a good few years before this, I have had my share of authentic Penang Char Kuey Teow (really, the only place to find the best Char Kuey Teow in the world) that I have not been able to find anywhere else in the country. Some versions of Char Kuey Teow in KL were pretty decent, but they were just not quite the same. Now that I’m in Sydney, it’s even harder to find a good plate of Char Kuey Teow, not to mention an authentic Penang-flavoured one! Therefore, I put it as a mission for myself to cook up a plate of Char Kuey Teow on my own, just to satisfy my cravings. Of course, what I get is still a far cry from the original version, but I’d have to make do with whatever ingredients and equipment I have to come up with the best that I can. :)

Char Kuey Teow

Home-cooked Char Kuey Teow

Ingredients:

Chilli paste:

  • 8 dried chillies (soaked in water)
  • 2 fresh red chillies
  • 2 bird’s eye chillies (optional)
  • 1 large shallot or 2 medium shallots
  • Dash of salt

Sauce:

  • 5 tbsp of light soya sauce
  • 2 tbsp of dark soya sauce
  • 2 tbsp of fish sauce
  • Dash of salt and white pepper

Others:

  • 10 prawns deshelled
  • 500g flat rice noodles / hor fun
  • 2 Chinese sausages / lap cheong sliced
  • 300g bean sprouts
  • 20 slices of fish cake
  • 5 cloves of garlic chopped
  • 2 eggs
  • 1-2 stalks of spring onions chopped into 4-cm lengths
  • Cooking oil

Char Kuey Teow ingredients

Some of the ingredients – prawns and fish cake slices

Lap cheong

Lap cheong / Chinese sausage

Steps:

1. Blend the ingredients of chilli paste until fine.

2. Heat the wok with 2 tbsp of oil and fry the garlic until slightly golden.

3. Add in the chilli paste and stir fry until fragrant.

4. Add in the prawns and fry until they turn orange in colour.

5. Add in the fish cake slices and Chinese sausages and fry until the fat of the sausages start to melt.

6. Add in the flat rice noodles, give a few good stir and pour in the sauce mixture.

7. Stir fry until the sauce covers all the noodles, and make space to break the eggs on the pan/wok.

8. Break the eggs and stir fry the noodles at high heat.

9. Lastly, add in the bean sprouts and spring onion.

Char Kuey Teow

Char Kuey Teow

The Char Kuey Teow turned out to be hot and spicy, just the way I like it. The drawback though, was that I don’t have a gas cooker at home, only an electric cook top. That meant that I couldn’t use a wok and flame to get the wok hei (heat of wok) that’s required to make this dish brilliant. Given what limited resources that I had, I was pretty satisfied with the outcome, and quite proud of myself too! I’m hoping that in the future, when we do get a gas cook top with a proper wok, I could improve on the taste of this home-cooked Char Kuey Teow. :)

Char Kuey Teow

4.0 from 1 reviews

Char Kuey Teow
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Main
Cuisine: Malaysian
Serves: 2-3
Ingredients
Chilli paste:
  • 8 dried chillies (soaked in water)
  • 2 fresh red chillies
  • 2 bird’s eye chillies (optional)
  • 1 large shallot or 2 medium shallots
  • Dash of salt
Sauce:
  • 5 tbsp of light soya sauce
  • 2 tbsp of dark soya sauce
  • 2 tbsp of fish sauce
  • Dash of salt and white pepper
Others:
  • 10 prawns deshelled
  • 500g flat rice noodles / hor fun
  • 2 Chinese sausages / lap cheong sliced
  • 300g bean sprouts
  • 20 slices of fish cake
  • 5 cloves of garlic chopped
  • 2 eggs
  • 1-2 stalks of spring onions chopped into 4-cm lengths
  • Cooking oil
Instructions
  1. Blend the ingredients of chilli paste until fine.
  2. Heat the wok with 2 tbsp of oil and fry the garlic until slightly golden.
  3. Add in the chilli paste and stir fry until fragrant.
  4. Add in the prawns and fry until they turn orange in colour.
  5. Add in the fish cake slices and Chinese sausages and fry until the fat of the sausages start to melt.
  6. Add in the flat rice noodles, give a few good stir and pour in the sauce mixture.
  7. Stir fry until the sauce covers all the noodles, and make space to break the eggs on the pan/wok.
  8. Break the eggs and stir fry the noodles at high heat.
  9. Lastly, add in the bean sprouts and spring onion.

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22 Comments
  • June 11th, 2013 2:13 PM
    small Kucing

    very professional la….Looks enough “wok hei”

    [Reply to comment]

    iamthewitch Reply:

    Looks can be deceiving.. haha

    [Reply to comment]

      

  • June 11th, 2013 3:49 PM
    Yee Ling

    Wow…simply delicious. I agreed with you…need a gas cooker to achieve the wok hei!

    [Reply to comment]

    iamthewitch Reply:

    Yes too bad I don’t have gas cooker. :(

    [Reply to comment]

      

  • June 11th, 2013 4:07 PM
    [SK]

    your CKT is indeed looking perfect!! given the limitations you mentioned, i would say this would be better than the CKT available in many restaurants out there?? can lah, can open your own restaurant already~~ :p

    [Reply to comment]

    iamthewitch Reply:

    You’re too kind! It’s indeed far from perfect, but it’s what I can come up with given the limitations. Open restaurant needs capital, unless you start it and I become the chef! haha

    [Reply to comment]

      

  • June 11th, 2013 5:13 PM
    Sean Eat Drink KL

    wow, this looks like ALMOST the ideal char kuey teow. almost for me cos i must have cockles in my CKT, heheh. great job on this, it looks very mouthwatering! :D and ooh, i think CKT beats pad thai, heheh :D

    [Reply to comment]

    iamthewitch Reply:

    No cockles for me because I don’t really like them. Haha.. thank you so much for the nice compliment!!

    [Reply to comment]

      

  • June 11th, 2013 7:50 PM
    suituapui

    Exactly like how I post a photo of Sibu kampua mee or talk about it…ane people will ask: is it wanton mee? Despite my telling everyone 1,0001 times!!! Some people seem to think that the whole world revolves around their world, so restrictively narrow-minded. Really puts me off.

    Your char kway teow looks terrific. Yum! Yum!

    [Reply to comment]

    iamthewitch Reply:

    Haha now I understand your frustration with the dish names! :) Thanks for the compliment! When are you going to cook your version?? :)

    [Reply to comment]

      

  • June 11th, 2013 10:32 PM
    claire

    Koay Teow is not easy to fry actually.. if one is not careful, they will turn to bits.. but I notice that you are doing a good job here! The lap cheong in the char koay teow enhances the flavor too!

    [Reply to comment]

    iamthewitch Reply:

    Thank you Claire! I am still trying to find nicer kuey teow here because I find the ones I had slightly too thick. But you’re right, the lap cheong makes a lot of difference!

    [Reply to comment]

      

  • June 12th, 2013 7:17 AM
    sycookies

    You are real impressive. I always thought it’s not possible to make this at home. Yours is looking real pro..

    [Reply to comment]

    iamthewitch Reply:

    You’re too kind! I’m sure anyone can do it if they are desperate like me! hehe

    [Reply to comment]

      

  • June 13th, 2013 10:25 AM
    ciki

    Clever la you.. is there anything you can’t make? ;)

    [Reply to comment]

    iamthewitch Reply:

    There are still tonnes of things I can’t make! Long way to go.. hehe

    [Reply to comment]

      

  • June 13th, 2013 12:16 PM
    KY

    just need seahum! but looks very good tho, congrats!

    [Reply to comment]

    iamthewitch Reply:

    Thank you! I personally don’t eat seehum so I purposely omitted it. :)

    [Reply to comment]

      

  • June 13th, 2013 11:28 PM
    foongpc

    Drooling at your CKT! Most important ingredient in a CKT for me is prawns and sausages! Yum!! So Penang still has the best CKT eh? Wanna ask where is the best CKT in Penang? : D

    [Reply to comment]

    iamthewitch Reply:

    Thank you!! Yes Penang still the best.. actually I find that most of the CKT in Penang are good. I was seldom disappointed with CKT if I just walked into any random hawker stalls there. :) But I guess even though it’s overrated, I still like the Lorong Selamat CKT. :)

    [Reply to comment]

      

  • June 16th, 2013 7:47 PM
    Kelly

    Lovely big prawns! Tricky to fry CKT at home without the noodles breaking apart, so well done!

    [Reply to comment]

    iamthewitch Reply:

    Thanks dear! Still plenty of room for improvement, if you ask me. But for now, it’s good enough to satisfy my occasional CKT cravings :)

    [Reply to comment]

      

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